#TackleThatFro| The Big Chop & TWA

 
photo cred: pierre_artista

Previous #TackleThatFro post:

At first, I started to stretch the time in between my relaxers. Then I just stopped with the relaxers completely so I could transition from relaxed to natural. I’d been told to clip my hair a little each month. I had friends that had gone that route and they did it so they wouldn’t lose the length of their hair. So as their new growth grew out, they would cut off the relaxed straight hair.

I was doing that for awhile and I just got impatient with the whole process. I’ve never been one to worry about that. I’ll get a pixie cut in a minute. So I gradually started cutting my hair during the period of a week. Then I finally went to a salon and got it completely cut off. So I transitioned for six months and I big chopped June 25, 2015.- #TackleThatFro| I Give Up Creamy Crack!

I stated in the previous article that I went the route of doing a big chop instead of transitioning my hair. At the time, it felt like the right decision for me and more so, because I’m an all or nothing type of girl. In my mind, I was thinking, “You’ve made the decision to go natural, so let’s go natural!” I didn’t want to invest in the time it would take to transition my hair from relaxed to natural when I could simply chop off all of the relaxed hair and BE natural.

In hindsight, my thinking was sound. But I admit now that I was impatient and I should have taken more time to learn not only about my hair but the care it would need. I’ve heard that some have gone through a “hair-crisis” after the B.C. That wasn’t necessarily the case for me. When I graduated high school I cut my chin-length hair into a pixie cut, so the length (or not having a length) of my hair didn’t bother me. My problem was I didn’t have the right products (#FRIYAY #3 Review| SheaMoisture Coconut and Hibiscus Curl Enhancing Smoothie) or knowledge that I needed.

I remember the leaving the salon the day of my BC and going into a Walgreens. I stared at their ethnic hair product selection in utter confusion. I didn’t know what I was supposed to get. I didn’t know of the LOC method or pre-poos, I barely knew what a deep conditioner was. I remember grabbing a cheap Suave conditioner, some sort of detangling spray and heading to the counter.

After some initial stumbling and falling, I started to figure things out. Styling at this point was really nonexistent for me, but I found that moisture was key. Before BC, I could hide my face behind my relaxed hair and my glasses. Living life with a TWA really brought the focus back on my face. It helped me get comfortable with myself and find ways to express myself and try things that I hadn’t thought of before.

Believe it or not, but this was my first time trying lipstick. I knew that with the focus off of my hair, I could get away with trying something different, so lipstick it was. I don’t remember the brand of the lipstick I’m wearing in this picture, but I remember it wasn’t matte and it got everywhere when I ate. After trying lipstick, I bought funkier jewelry. I was already a jewelry lover before my BC, but afterward, I felt that I could get away with wearing bigger earrings.

But just like with anything, hair takes time. You do get the benefit of growing your hair out as one even length and texture when you BC but don’t expect magical results. Your hair will still grow at the rate your hair normally grows. I made the mistake at the beginning of comparing my journey against the youtube videos I was seeing online. Until one day, I realized that we are all different. Sometimes hair does best when it is just left alone, and that’s where protective styling comes into play. I’ll talk more about that next time.

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6 Comments

  1. I also recently did the big chop. My hair had grown about 12″ in two years but my fro had a lot of colour and heat damage so I decided to start treating it better by starting with the BC. I now follow a strict conditioning routine and my hair feels and looks great even if it’s still a TWA. I use olive oil and coconut oil for extra moisture and it really does work great. You’re totally right about us all being different and I believe that we should embrace that and learn to love and care for who we are and what we have. Thanks for the inspiring post.
    ( https://keepingitcassie.wordpress.com )

    1. Thank you for sharing your story. It’s definitely a learning process but I think that helps with accepting who we are and how our hair works

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